What does the star nosed mole use its nose for?

What do moles use their nose for?

The moles use their wormy noses to feel their way to a tasty dinner. The sensitive organs on each appendage provide a rapid response touch system that detects potential prey in the moles’ dark, underground world.

How does Star-nosed mole eat?

Star-nosed moles are insectivores. They eat earthworms as well as a variety of aquatic insects. When they eat, the nose tentacles are clumped up out of the way. … They can find prey using its sense of touch, and some research suggests the tentacles may also sense electrical impulses from the insects they eat.

What is the lifespan of a star-nosed mole?

Lifespan, ageing, and relevant traits

Considering its small reproductive output, it has been speculated that these animals may live up to 3 to 4 years. Record longevity in captivity, however, is only 2.5 years [0671]. Further studies may be necessary.

Are star-nosed mole rare?

Star-nosed moles are not uncommon, just uncommonly seen, said Catania. The species’ range stretches along the Eastern portions of the U.S. and Canada. So keep an eye out–what you find just might surprise you.

Do star-nosed moles lay eggs?

This mole mates in late winter or early spring, and the female has one litter of typically four or five young in late spring or early summer. However, females are known to have a second litter if their first is unsuccessful. At birth, each offspring is about 5 cm (2 in) long, hairless, and weighs about 1.5 g.

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What are the natural predators of the star-nosed mole?

The life span of the star-nosed mole is not known. Predators: Raptors, including screech, great horned, long-eared, barred, and barn owls, and red-tailed hawks; mammals such as striped skunks, weasels, minks, and foxes; and fish such as the northern pike prey on this mammal.

What countries does the star-nosed mole live in?

Habitat: Areas with moist soil and poor drainage, such as forests, marshes, peat land, and the banks of streams and ponds. Location: Native to eastern North America, from Quebec and Newfoundland, south to at least Virginia, and west to North Dakota.